Why Do We Trust Strangers? Social Trust, Moral Reasoning and Identity

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Maria Banu

Abstract

Behavioral economists have extensively argued against consequentialist theories of social trust. The most recent studies show that trust decisions are mainly expressive. Trust-taking behavior is non-consequential and linked to betrayal aversion, norms, and self-identity. Trustfulness is thus granted an affective and normative dimension. Yet these studies lack an integrative theoretical framework. In light of these results, this paper argues that reaching a more comprehensive understanding of the notion of social trust may draw on conceptual resources and empirical insights from moral psychology. Specifically, future studies may test and explore further the non-consequential aspects of social trust in connection with moral reasoning and moral identity.

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How to Cite
BANU, Maria. Why Do We Trust Strangers? Social Trust, Moral Reasoning and Identity. Annals of the University of Bucharest - Philosophy Series, [S.l.], v. 67, n. 2, p. 39-66, apr. 2019. ISSN 0068-3175. Available at: <http://annals.ub-filosofie.ro/index.php/annals/article/view/278>. Date accessed: 22 nov. 2019.
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